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Building Learning Power

Building Learning Power

 

What is Building Learning Power?

 

Building Learning Power (BLP) is about helping our children to become better learners. By creating a climate that fosters good learning habits and attitudes we hope to enable them to face challenges and difficulties in a calm,

confident and creative way.

 

Research has shown that children who are confident of their own learning ability learn faster and learn more efficiently. They concentrate more, think harder and find learning more rewarding and enjoyable.

 

This is not an instant programme but it takes root and develops over time. Being a good learner involves knowing what is worth learning, what you are good at learning (and what you are not so good at), who can help you, how to face a problem without getting upset and what is the best learning tool for a particular job.

 

Learning about learning positively

impacts on children’s achievements!

 

What does Building Learning Power look like ?

 

At Hillside we are working to develop four different learning behaviours which have been identified within research as being essential in supporting children to become better learners. To support children with their learning we have linked these learning behaviours with a number of different

animals and values.

 

You may have heard your children already using some of the language of learning that has been introduced in school or talking about being one of the

following animals:

 

¨ Resilient Rhino (Perseverance and Aspiration) - not giving up and aiming to be the best we possibly can be.

 

¨ Resourceful Squirrel (Creativity and Enjoyment) - being able to use a range of learning strategies and knowing what to do when you get stuck.

 

¨ Relationship Penguin (Teamwork and Responsibility) - being able to learn with and from others, as well as on your own.

 

¨ Reflective  Chameleon (Pride and Confidence) - being able to think about yourself as a learner and  how you might improve or change things in the  future.

 

 

How can you help at home?

 

¨ Ask not what they did at school, but what they learned.

¨ Ask your child ‘what is the biggest learning challenge you faced today?’ and ‘How did you overcome it?’

¨ Refer to the different animals and ask how they have shown they are a rhino, squirrel, penguin or chameleon.

¨ Welcome and foster your child’s questioning spirit as much as you can.

¨ Use the language of learning  and our learning animals when undertaking tasks at home.

¨ If your child becomes stuck in their learning ask them to think of what they would have to do at school to get ‘unstuck.’

¨ Involve them in your own learning activities by ‘thinking aloud’ as you attempt a DIY project or try out a new recipe. Seeing that you may also struggle at times helps children to grow and understand how to cope with uncertainties and challenges.

¨ Praise your child when they persevere.

¨ Help them to find interests and activities that are really absorbing.

¨ Talk with them about what helps them to concentrate and manage distractions.

¨ Talk about how you feel when you are taking on a challenge.

 

 

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